Re-act, Re-trace

Re-act, Re-trace is part of a program of contemporary Australian and international video art, screening for one hour each afternoon, over five days.

Screening Program

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, City Score, 2018, High Definition digital video, colour, sound, 6 min 34 sec

The video work City Score traces the steps of the Women’s March through Melbourne’s urban landscape, exploring the act of walking as a consideration of time, place and movement and as a marker of the weight of architecture in relation to the body. The movement is accompanied by a soundscape that Mangano and Mangano suggest ‘embodies a political consciousness, a calling of possibilities that speaks of the singular body, while the vocal soundscape suggests a collective’. The audio also includes the sound of Walking Score being played, propelling the motion of walking throughout key points in the city, revealing the act of marching as a performative protest on a public stage.

Lida Abdul, In Transit, 2008, 16mm film transferred to digital video, 16:9, colour, sound, 4 min 56 sec

Abdul's video work In Transit features school children filling the void of a military airplane with cotton, attaching ropes, and attempting to fly the airplane like a kite. In Abdul's words: "It's really a playful piece, a fantasy piece, with a group of kids who are playing with a very old Russian plane, that was left over years ago. I was really struck by this piece because it looks between a plane and a bird. It's like a skeleton almost….” The harsh reality of the destruction of war is counterpointed by hope in the future represented by the children. "I want to bring out the beauty of the tragic way in which children face violent scenarios and show how they can be flexible in similar conditions with their innocence, by creating an antidote to the tragedy of their condition. Without children playing and running through the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan today would be even more violent than it is.”

Angelica Mesiti, Tossed by Waves, 2017, single-channel High Definition video, 16:9, colour, silent, 6 min 17 sec

Tossed by Waves is marked by silence and languorous travelling movements. The camera captures an ambiguous procession of sculptural bodies, entangled and clamped onto a stone trunk. The monument is never quite revealed, yet clues, such as graffiti bearing the names of loved ones and messages of hope, suggest the present time. This is Mesiti’s meditation on turbulence and resilience from the perspective of her adopted city of Paris, whose motto fluctuat nec mergitur translates as ‘tossed by the waves but does not sink’. In use since the mid-1300s, the phrase has gained a resurgence of popularity with the November Paris attacks in 2015. Over the past two years, Mesiti has engaged with the Place de la République as a place of memory, protest, and perhaps foremost as a contemporary agora - the symbolic heart of a city standing for its democratic values.

Mike Parr, Unaustralian, 2003, single-channel video, Standard Definition, 4:3, black and white, stereo sound, 19 minutes 36 seconds

In UnAustralian, Parr has his lips sewn shut and his face threaded into a contorted grimace by an assistant. This performance acts as a protest against the psychological, political and literal violence perpetrated against asylum seekers by the Howard-era Australian government.

Co-curated by Kelli Alred and Anna Schwartz Gallery.

Presented in partnership with Anna Schwartz Gallery.

This event has now finished

Date

Fri 6 Sep
4–5pm

Venue

Accessibility

The venue requires stair access

Entry

Free (18+ event)

Biographies

Lida Abdul

Lida Abdul fled Afghanistan with her family following the Soviet invasion in 1979, and lived as refugee in India and Germany before immigrating to the United States. Abdul’s work often focuses on bodies and landscapes, exploring their complex interaction as a way to examine notions of identity, homeland, exile, and political resistance. Abdul’s art also addresses depiction of Afghan citizens in Western mass media, where it is common to only report on Afghanistan in the context of terror and war. Through her art, Abdul hopes Western representations will expand beyond that image and learn more about their people and cultures.

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano have largely worked collaboratively throughout their artistic careers. This is a central focus of their work, with their similar selves featuring as a starting point for ideas and actions. Their performances and videos explore the relationship between the body and its ability to form a connection with objects, time and space. This is communicated in the artists’ work through subtle gestures, physical intimacy and interactions with immediate environments.

Angelica Mesiti

Angelica Mesiti has long been fascinated by performance: as a mode of storytelling and a means to express social ideas in physical form. In recent years she has been making videos that reveal how culture is manifested through non-linguistic forms of communication, and especially through vocabularies of sound and gesture. While borrowing archetypes and stylistic cues from cinema, and using the visual language of film to present detailed studies of human subjects in heightened states of reverie or reflection, Mesiti’s works eschew linearity. Instead, she uses a rich, aesthetic treatment to uncover the transformative potential of all human beings, valuing the qualities of ambiguity and indeterminacy in their own right.

Mike Parr

Interrogating formal and cultural orthodoxies, the vast and uncompromising practice of Mike Parr assumes multiple forms through a conflation of drawing, printmaking, sculpture and performance. Exploring the limits of his physical and mental capacity, Parr’s highly influential performance practice employs his own body as a means to examine identity and political conventions of the twentieth century. His decade-long ‘Self Portrait Project’ also draws upon his own subjectivity, unfolding as a cathartic reflection on selfhood and the proliferation of perspective.

Image

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano, City Score, 2018, High Definition digital video, colour, sound, 6 min 34 sec. Courtesy the artist and Anna Schwartz Gallery.

This event has now finished

Date

Fri 6 Sep
4–5pm

Venue

Anna Schwartz Gallery
185 Flinders Lane
Melbourne VIC 3000

Accessibility

The venue requires stair access

Entry

Free (18+ event)